Photos: On the Ferry on a Sunny Hebridean Spring Day

Yesterday I caught the ferry from Uig to Tarbert to deliver a painting, being met at the terminal because the ferry turns around rapidly, 20 minutes between scheduled arrival and departure. It was a nary-a-cloud-in-the-sky day with glorious sunshine, albeit wish-I’d-remembered-my-gloves cold.

This is the painting:

SOLD. “Neighbourhood Watch” 60x80cm

Painting-in-Progress: Minch Seascape

It’s that time of year again when the sun’s moved north and is setting past the tip of the Waternish peninsula and late (about 9pm) making for hours of enticing patterns and colours on the expanse of the Minch (sea between Skye and Harris). My fingers have been itching to paint it again. Here are a few work-in-progress photos, canvas size 120x60cm.

Minch Seascape painting
Yes, I am indeed mixing the sea colours directly on the canvas. I used the “sea area” as a palette and brush-wiping space while painting the rocky foreground and islands. Not only does it mean there’s no palette to clean, but also no paint wasted and a colour coherence between the sea and the rest of the painting. The “trick” is to use a biggish brush and to not overblend it into a uniform colour. It’ll get more layers of paint on top anyway.
Minch Seascape painting horizon
Painting the sea horizon with a flat brush and Prussian blue. The “trick” to this is that it has to be a really good brush, not one with errant hairs. And practice. And doing it when the islands are dry so it can be wiped off if it does go astray.
Minch Seascape painting horizon tape
The “trick” to getting the sharp edge on the outer islands is masking tape. Pulling it off for the ‘great reveal’ is always a fun moment!

 

New Minch Seascape: Storm Warning

Inspired by this winter’s storms and the non-arrival of spring. The paint is still drying in places where it’s particularly thick, so to remove the temptation of poking at it (“Are you dry yet…?!“) it’s now propped on the bookshelves in the in-house art critic’s office.

Minch Seascape Painting: Storm Warming
“Storm Warning”
75x75cm
Acrylic on canvas

Detail from Storm Warning painting

Another Red Dot Day: “Moon over the Minch”

Popped into Skyeworks Gallery this afternoon to drop off a few Wearable Art pieces and some cards, only to discover the “Moon Over the Minch” had sold this morning. That’s two big paintings in two days! And, yes, I did celebrate with a piece of cake in the bakery downstairs.

Moon over the Minch seascape by Skye artist Marion Boddy-Evans
Moon over the Minch
100x50cm
SOLD

3 Minch Studies

These three small studies of the colours of the Minch, looking cross towards Harris, were done on 300gsm rough watercolour paper, three sheets placed alongside one another on a large board on my easel. The differences between them aren’t dramatic, but rather they’re studies focusing on the effect of small things, changes made after the initial laying in of colours of possibilities I want to consider. Here they are side by side for easy comparison:

Minch Study, from Skye to Harris I, by Skye-based Artist Marion Boddy-Evans Minch Study, from Skye to Harris II, by Scottish Artist Marion Boddy-Evans Minch Study, from Skye to Harris III, by Scottish Artist Marion Boddy-Evans

I don’t have a favourite overall, there are pieces from each I will use in a larger painting at some point.

Minch Study, from Skye to Harris I, by Skye-based Artist Marion Boddy-Evans
Using the long edge of a palette knife to spread and mix still-wet sections of separate colour in the sea, with the thought that it could convey a sense of a moving swell. Sea gets darker overall into the distance.
Minch Study, from Skye to Harris II, by Scottish Artist Marion Boddy-Evans
Light blue on the horizon line and additional light blues over the dark blue sea in the distance. I think the light horizon line could’ve been thinner, or possibly an even-lighter line added. I feel the lighter blues in the distant sea enhance the feeling of depth.
Minch Study, from Skye to Harris III, by Scottish Artist Marion Boddy-Evans
Very dark horizon line, with blues gradually getting lighter towards the foreground. Knife-spread swells in the distance. Softer edges on the tops of the hills of Harris, suggesting moving clouds.

Two Mini Minches

I’ve been painting on a small scale again, on 7×5″ canvas (about 18x12cm). These two “mini Minch” seascapes are a memory of some of the wild weather I’ve watched blow across the view, where white horses churn up deep Prussian blue. Available from Skyeworks Gallery, ?35 each.

2 Mini Minch Paintings