3 Forest Studies using Quinacridone Gold

The starting point for these three studies was quinacridone gold, a transparent pigment. Spread thinly over white it’s got a rich inner glow. Used thickly it’s surprisingly dark, and mixed with titanium white you’ve got an opaque earthy-red gold. It’s been a while since I’ve used it, and wanted to get familiar with it again. Other colours I used include perelyne black, magenta, ultramarine blue, and burnt umber. Here are the studies side by side for easy comparison:

Forest Study in Quinacridone Gold Forest Study in Quinacridone Gold II by Scottish Artist Marion Boddy-Evans Forest Study in Quinacridone Gold by Skye-based Artist Marion Boddy-Evans
Forest Study in Quinacridone Gold
Letting the quinacridone gold do its thing. Working wet-on-wet using the edge of a palette knife to add dark and lights for tree trunks. Scratching into the paint for light lines. Only a little blue added as a top layer for sky at the top,
Forest Study in Quinacridone Gold II by Scottish Artist Marion Boddy-Evans
More blue in the sky, and redder browns at base, creating more of a band in the centre where the quinacridone gold dominates..
Forest Study in Quinacridone Gold by Skye-based Artist Marion Boddy-Evans
Encouraging the sky blue to run down by spraying on some water, increasing the white in the tree trunks. I think there’s a greater sense of depth in the golden glow, as if there’s a low sun shining through a woodland you can’t see through.

Sold: Listening to Leaves Falling

The sale of “Listening to Leaves Falling” at Skyeworks to a family from Germany means I’ve only one large forest painting at the moment: Wodeland. (No, that’s not a typo, it’s related to the painting being dominated by blue.) Definitely time to translate another of various woodland images bouncing around my mind onto canvas and to finish Tartan trees. Maybe start with the latter so it’ll be ready for the Lochalsh Art Fair towards the end of August.

Listening to Leaves Falling forest painting Scotland
Listening to Leaves Falling
100x100cm
Acrylic on canvas
Sold

Painting-in-Progress: Starting with Magenta Trees

Wanting to move away from the blues and greens of recent paintings, I decided I’d start a forest painting with a seriously intense colour, magenta. It does still tie into reality through foxgloves and pink-purple heathers, so there is a little landscape-painting logic behind the choice.

I started with adding some texture in thin vertical strips for tree trunks, then once this has dried I brushed over magenta. I added a little red to this for a bit of variation, then left it to dry before starting to layer in colour that will ultimately read as “tree trunks”. If you’re wondering about the background, I did this at Skyeworks Gallery.

Painting in progress magenta trees
After the magenta/red ground had dried, I added the first tree layer.
Painting in progress magenta trees
Between the first layer of trees, I added blue for sky (which will become blue for water instead).
Then greens for grass/forest undergrowth (which would soon become green for leaves/foliage instead).
Then greens for grass/forest undergrowth (which would soon become green for leaves/foliage instead).
Turned sideways to allow new layer of blues to run, which is where I decide blues will be at bottom of painting not the top, and turn it  "upside down".
Turned sideways to allow new layer of blues to run, which is where I decide blues will be at bottom of painting not the top, and turn it “upside down”.
Masking tape added so that whatever I did next, some of the colours as they are now will be retained. The masking tape is torn in half to give a ragged edge to enhance the feeling of tree trunks.
Masking tape added so that whatever I did next, some of the colours as they are now will be retained. The masking tape is torn in half and the straight edges put together, to give a ragged edge to enhance the feeling of tree trunks.
How it looked the moment before I removed the masking tape.
How it looked the moment before I removed the masking tape.
With the tape removed.
With the tape removed.? Work in progess. Size 100x50cm.

This is still a work-in-progress. I have some idea of where I’ll go next (such as refining the darks), but have left the painting at Skyeworks so I’ll have to see if what I’ve in mind still applies when I see it again on Wednesday.

One comment so far from someone who’s seen it has been that it’s “tweed handbag colours”, referencing the bright pinks popular in modern tweeds. Any other suggestions?

Listening to Bluebells

When it’s bluebell season, the colours in woodlands changes yet again. In some places the flowers carpet the woodland floor, influencing the colour of everything you see, almost as if I’m wearing turquoise-tinted glasses. This painting is a compilation of memories of walking and sitting amongst bluebells in different woodlands. The dominant colour used was a phthalo turquoise, a strong, staining colour that easily takes all your mixed colours on your palette if you’re not paying attention. It also teaches you to clean a brush properly because if there’s a little left in a brush, you’ll know about it!

Painting "Listening to Bluebells" by Marion Boddy-Evans
Size: 122x81cm. Acrylic on Canvas. Sold.

This detail from the painting is about life size. As you get closer and closer to the canvas, the pieces of paint start dissolving into a colourful chaos. It also reveals the different colours in the dark background, created with various glazed layers. The variation in colour showing through is created by working with a big brush and not meticulously covering every millimetre but letting there be ‘missed bits’.

Detail from Painting "Listening to Bluebells" by Marion Boddy-Evans