Additions to My Painted Flock

My flock of little paintings at Skyeworks Gallery has grown a bit, with a few new sheep (this time with reds), plus a Highland cow and, because it’s been so hot, a shady tree (albeit in autumnal colours, shedding leaves).

Sizes: 5×5″ or 5×7″. Price: ?35. International shipping is about ?15. Contact Skyeworks Gallery by email skyeworksgallery@gmail.com, on Facebook or phone.

Small Paintings at Skyeworks Gallery Isle of Skye

Small Paintings at Skyeworks Gallery Isle of Skye
Small Paintings at Skyeworks Gallery Isle of Skye

Painting in Progress: Grazing the Loch (Part 2)

So, at the end of another day’s painting, this is how Grazing the Loch looks (this was it yesterday). The weather’s got a bit windier, creating white horses on the sea and blowing in a bit of mist. Some daisies have also popped up in the grass. You can’t see it in the photos, but the cliff edge in the distance has some iridescent silver and gold on it, part of an underlayer; it shows if there’s side light. It’s now at the “Am I there yet?” stage, where I ponder it.

Work-in-Progress: Grazing the Loch Shore. Size: 120x60cm
Work-in-Progress: Grazing the Loch Shore.
Size: 120x60cm

Detail: Grazing the Loch Shore sheep painting

Detail: Grazing the Loch Shore sheep painting

Update: I showed it to the couple who commissioned it, and they love it. So now just to tidy up the edges and varnish it.

Painting in Progress: Grazing the Loch

I’m waiting for the paint to dry on this before I have another round with it. My fingers are itching to fix the all-to-neat alignment of the shoreline and sheep heads, but first the paint needs to dry. I also need to decide whether to add a cloud in the sky to cast the shadow on the distant hilltop, or lighten it. Plus all the other additions, tweaks, adjustments, not-yet-put-in-ideas bouncing around my head. And deciding whether it’ll have daisies or buttercups in the foreground. Perhaps a few poppies for a splash of red? Are we there yet? Is it dry yet…?

Work-in-Progress: Grazing the Loch Shore
Work-in-Progress: Grazing the Loch Shore.
Size: 120x60cm
Commissioned painting

Part 2: Are We There Yet?

Two Mini Minches

I’ve been painting on a small scale again, on 7×5″ canvas (about 18x12cm). These two “mini Minch” seascapes are a memory of some of the wild weather I’ve watched blow across the view, where white horses churn up deep Prussian blue. Available from Skyeworks Gallery, ?35 each.

2 Mini Minch Paintings

Passing Place

Passing on the way from the hairdressers?
(For those who haven’t encountered one, the diamond-shaped roadsign indicates a passing place on a single-track road. More modern versions are small white squares with the words “passing place”, which I find aren’t as easy to spot from a distance when driving. This photo was taken on the lower part of the Quiraing Road on the Staffin side.)

Passing place sign with sheep on Isle of Skye

SOLD: Edges of Cuillin & Skye

Two large paintings from my Edges series have sold in the past week.

Edge of the Cuillin is headed towards Oxford with a family who each had other paintings they liked too but all agreed on this one. I happened to be in Skyeworks when they came in (I do occasional days besides my regular Saturdays on the desk) and it was a joy showing them, and talking about, various paintings.

Edge of the Cuillin  painting by Marion Boddy-Evans
Edge of the Cuillin
76x76cm
SOLD

Edge of Skye, which is being bought through Skyeworks Gallery’s Piece by Piece scheme, will be heading not quite so far south in a few months. It’s being bought by someone who visits Skye regularly and always comes into the gallery for a look and a chat. I’m thrilled this is where this painting is going.

Edge of Skye painting by Marion Boddy-Evans
Edge of Skye
122x60cm
SOLD

Tiny Texture

Don’t think that texture is something for large paintings only. This photo shows some tiny paintings on wood, about 5cm/2″, with texture paste and base-layer colours applied. They will ultimately become brooches or pendants, part of my Wearable Art series.

Tiny Texture Paintings

Sunny Summer Skye Sketching

I spent yesterday sketching in the sunshine at various locations on the north of the Trotternish Peninsula. Starting at that favourite of spots, the slipway at Camus Mor, looking westwards, towards the rocky shore and cliffs:
Skye  Sketching: Camus Mor

Then north a bit, to a viewpoint looking towards the ruins of Duntulm Castle. When the tide is out, the distant part of the shore is flat slabs of rock rather than pebbles.Skye  Sketching: Duntulm Castle

Then round to Staffin beach, sitting where I could see the river running into the sea:
Skye  Sketching: Staffin

Watched, as ever, by some munching sheep:
Skye  Sketching: Staffin Sheep

Then over the Quiraing to a viewpoint overlooking Uig/Idigrill, focusing on the sea and distant cliffs(but just look at all those variations of green!):
Skye  Sketching: Overlooking Uig

And for those interested, a photo of what I was using. My palette with Sennelier watercolours (which I love for the saturated colour but are honey-based and in the hot sunshine it’s crucial to keep the palette flat or the paint seeps out of their allocated slots making a sticky mess!), water container, pencil box with black pen, pencil, few watersoluble coloured pencils, and brushes that fit into it. Not shown: bottle with clean water for both me and rinsing my brushes. Also not shown: quite a few less satisfactory resolved sketches!
Sketching art supplies

Painting-in-Progress: Starting with Magenta Trees

Wanting to move away from the blues and greens of recent paintings, I decided I’d start a forest painting with a seriously intense colour, magenta. It does still tie into reality through foxgloves and pink-purple heathers, so there is a little landscape-painting logic behind the choice.

I started with adding some texture in thin vertical strips for tree trunks, then once this has dried I brushed over magenta. I added a little red to this for a bit of variation, then left it to dry before starting to layer in colour that will ultimately read as “tree trunks”. If you’re wondering about the background, I did this at Skyeworks Gallery.

Painting in progress magenta trees
After the magenta/red ground had dried, I added the first tree layer.
Painting in progress magenta trees
Between the first layer of trees, I added blue for sky (which will become blue for water instead).
Then greens for grass/forest undergrowth (which would soon become green for leaves/foliage instead).
Then greens for grass/forest undergrowth (which would soon become green for leaves/foliage instead).
Turned sideways to allow new layer of blues to run, which is where I decide blues will be at bottom of painting not the top, and turn it  "upside down".
Turned sideways to allow new layer of blues to run, which is where I decide blues will be at bottom of painting not the top, and turn it “upside down”.
Masking tape added so that whatever I did next, some of the colours as they are now will be retained. The masking tape is torn in half to give a ragged edge to enhance the feeling of tree trunks.
Masking tape added so that whatever I did next, some of the colours as they are now will be retained. The masking tape is torn in half and the straight edges put together, to give a ragged edge to enhance the feeling of tree trunks.
How it looked the moment before I removed the masking tape.
How it looked the moment before I removed the masking tape.
With the tape removed.
With the tape removed.? Work in progess. Size 100x50cm.

This is still a work-in-progress. I have some idea of where I’ll go next (such as refining the darks), but have left the painting at Skyeworks so I’ll have to see if what I’ve in mind still applies when I see it again on Wednesday.

One comment so far from someone who’s seen it has been that it’s “tweed handbag colours”, referencing the bright pinks popular in modern tweeds. Any other suggestions?