How Long Did It Take to Paint?

How long it takes to create a painting is a measure of time and nothing else. Sometimes things flow; other times it takes considerable effort to get a painting to a satisfactory point. More time spent on a painting doesn’t inherently make it a better painting.

There’s also the question of what’s being included in the calculation: is it only when you’ve a brush in your hand applying paint or does it include planning and pondering and development work such as sketching? Every painting carries with it the history of every painting that came before. And there’s that some people wield a brush at a faster pace than others.

If you’re in a situation where time is limited, such as life painting with a model or plein-air painting at sunset, you might adapt how you approach the painting to the time available.

Yet “how long did it take” remains intriguing, something to measure our own painting skills against others and our previous paintings. Perhaps because it’s a tangible thing amongst all the intangibles of art.

I don’t often keep deliberate track of the time I spend painting, but a few days ago I did because I surprised myself when I paused for the first time and realised it’d only been 20 minutes. It had felt like longer and I was intrigued by how far I’d gotten already; my previous paintings at this location had taken me far longer.

Starting time was 10:30. Oil paint on 9×12″ panel.
I try to step well back regularly when painting to see things with fresher eyes.
The main difference between the last two photos is the rock on the lower right; it took me longer to realise I needed to change this than to do it.

When I got to this point, I was conflicted because I felt I wanted to stop but as it’d only been an hour I worried it was it too soon to stop but then would I overwork it if I continued? I took me a bit of pondering to decide it was okay to stop. The question then becomes, do I include this time in how long it took me to paint this?


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Painting Daisies in a Concertina Sketchbook (with video)

If you’ve not met one before, a concertina sketchbook has one long zigzag page that folds up between the covers. How many pages it has and what type of paper depends on the brand; the one I’m using in this video is from Seawhite and slips into a case. (If you don’t see the video below, click here to go to my Vimeo channel.)

I started with Payne’s grey acrylic ink, then watercolour in a dropper bottle (including two granulating greens), watercolour from my set using a brush, acrylic paint (cadmiun yellow light and medium), a mixed blue-grey acrylic ink (the masking tape on the bottle tells me it’s a colour I’ve mixed), white acrylic ink (Sennelier’s super-opaque white), and ultimately a touch of orange acrylic ink to deepen the yellows in the flower centres.

The decision as to how many pages to do was intuitive, a feeling for how many would be manageable across the width of my table (and off a bit) and would probably not be totally dry by the time I got back to the start with a new colour. I’m drawing daisies from a mixture of memory and the ones in the jug in front of me, which I turned around at various points so I was seeing ‘new’ daisies.

The colours initially are a bit gloomy, but when I add the bright green these become “background shadows” and everything turns brighter. I had visualised this brighter layer of green before I started, I just didn’t know exactly when I would do it. I’ve got a list in my mind of what layers I’m going to do (colours/materials) but if you’re new to working like this it’s worth taking the time to draw up a list, and having everything to hand, so when you’re painting the decisions are already made and you can concentrate on painting.

What will I do with the rest of the pages? At the moment my thought is to continue with flowers, probably the pink foxgloves that are flowering now too, but I’ll see what I feel like when I start again.

This is only the second concertina sketchbook I’ve used; the first has a watercolour of the sea/weather from my studio on every pair of pages, with a consistent positioning of the horizon line across the pages (drawn in with a pencil before I started). I’m sure there will be more, not least because I have a little Sennelier one with thicker paper I won in a competition and the Moleskine one the in-house art critic gave me last Christmas to try.

From Location to Studio Painting: “On Edge”

The connection between the sketching and painting I do on location (and the sitting just looking) and the painting I do in my studio isn’t always direct, but sometimes the dots that need to be joined are fairly evident, as with this studio painting finished a few days ago:

“On Edge”. 30x30cm, acrylic on wood panel.

Its path started last week when I painted at Duntulm (northwestern tip of the Trotternish Peninsula on Skye) at low tide on consecutive days, ending up with two watercolours and two studies in oil paint.

If you’ve looked up Duntulm on a map and seen the word “castle”, don’t get overly excited as there’s not much left.

The first day it was misty, clearing as the morning progressed. I started sitting on the grass, looking down over a stretch of rocky shore (there’s quite a drop where the grass ends in the photo below), painting with watercolour. The mist slowed the speed with which the watercolour dried, making wet-into-wet easy and an interesting change of pace with the paint.

I had my big set of pan watercolours, along with bottles of fluid watercolour and my beloved Payne’s grey acrylic ink (which I didn’t use for once). The red fabric is the corner of my raincoat which I was sitting on.

Then I moved along and down a bit, to a grassy bank, and got out my oil paints.

I stopped painting on this because I got tired, so it’s more of a loose study or sketch rather than a finished plein-air painting. Closer-up photo further below.
Sea, mist, winding road, sheep, and wild yellow irises

These two photos give a wider view of the location, and how the colours of the sea change with the light conditions of the two days.


Back in my studio, I put the watercolours and two oil paintings up on my easel as I painted at my table on a wood panel (with a layer of clear gesso on it).

Texture paste was applied with a palette knife, both Lava Black, which is a coarse-grained texture perfect for sandy shores, and Golden’s Light Modelling Paste which dries to an absorbent surface on which watery acrylic behaves a bit like watercolour.

The latter can also be scratched into with a sharp edge fairly easily when it’s relatively newly dried. If you look at the lowest band of rock in the next three work-in-progress photos, you’ll see how I abandoned having a band of rounded slabs of rock and scratched into it with the point of a palette knife so this section looks more like the others.

Painting-in-progress photo 1
Painting-in-progress photo 1
Painting-in-progress photo 3

Here’s the final painting, plus several detail photos:


Where next? I’ve already started another studio painting based on this location, again using texture paste and acrylic but this time on an unprimed wooden board. Without gesso on the board, thin acrylic sinks in and the woodgrain is revealed, as you can see below:

It having dried overnight, I’ve started adding some colour to the rocky shore. Trying not to lose the woodgrain on the right-hand “sea section” is inhibiting me as I’m painting, as are my favourite bits of my just-finished painting because I keep comparing the two. The “sea area” surface is very absorbent any any stray paint will soak in and dry almost instantly, so I’m second-guessing what I’m doing before I do it, rather than responding to what’s happening as I paint. It’s what I mentally label as “trying too hard”. The photo below is where I stopped struggling with it and left it to dry again; I will give it a break for a couple of days.

Project Photo Gallery: Abstracted Grids

An email from a friend reminded me I hadn’t done the photo gallery for May’s painting project yet (nor June’s newsletter). Apologies for keeping you waiting; June has rather slipped away from me, but pulling this photo gallery together this morning has reminded me of how much fun there is to be had with grids. So without further ado, here they are for you to enjoy:

By Bee: “windows on my work room. Fun with a fountain pen.”
From Marion: ” Each is intriguing by itself, and then together create a story, a sense of location.”
ByEddie: “This is a tour around my studio with a pencil. Good luck with recognising anything here.”

From Marion: My first thought was “I bet I can recognise things” and sure, there are a few, brushes for instance, a mannekin and clock. Possibly a tape dispenser. And a boat, but is it a model or a painting if a boat? It becomes absorbing, unpicking a puzzle and finding the strands of the story.
By Eddie: “Cutting up failed paintings is a fun way to use them.”
By Eddie: “I liked the cut up technique interesting but found the small size a bit limiting. This an abstract which I tore up to use the back of the paper. A bit of cutting and rearranging was fun.”

From Marion: It’s intriguing how a cut-up piece takes on a new life and becomes more than it was before. The tidier side of my personality keeps wanting to nudge the ones that are just a little out of alignment, though I realise this would make the composition more rigid and it’ll feel different.
By Eddie: “I am a little concerned that this could become addictive but it’s a great use for failed watercolours.”

From Marion: “If you find yourself deliberately messing up a painting so you can do this, then you’ve become addicted! It’s like each little block is a chapter and together they create a story. Each time I allow my eyes to circle around the blocks a different one grabs my attention.
By Eddie: “If I do this again I will use larger squares (these are 2cm, pastel) as I found them pretty difficult.”
By Cathi: As usual the “must look like what it is” side of me won over. I have ended up with lots of little quick sketch ideas of my garden. 2” squares giving an A2 finished size.
By Cathi, watercolour on A3: “This is a more abstract version of the previous one. Spot the bluebells.”
By Cathi, pastel

May’s project led me in several directions:

This was created looking at a bunch of roses in a yellow jug. The closer-up details that are more abstracted and intriguing work better for me, but I also like the blocks that combine line and colour (second row, second from the right).
See Blocks of Abstraction: Two Cut-Ups
It becomes quite mesmerising shifting little sections of a failed painting around as it transforms into something new
This is my favourite from the various pieces May’s project led me to doing. See A Dozen Daisies

The details of June’s painting project (bluebells) can be found here. And a reminder that if you’d like to help with your project paintings, the way to do this is to become a project subscriber via Patreon (now with £, $ and Euro options; I use Patreon because the site deals with the VAT paperwork for me).

Monday Motivator: Returning to Pencil

Monday motivator art quotes

“I am returning to the pencil. The premise of which remark signifies consciousness that at some point I left the pencil, a moment I have no recollection of. I am going to have to guess. It was around the age of eleven, just as learning got serious, that we were told we could use biro or fountain pens instead. Implicit in this message was the notion that pencil was somehow junior, inferior, not serious. …

“Just as I cannot remember stopping using them, I can’t quite pinpoint their return. …

“I find I can’t read now without one. For underlining and margin notes, the pencil’s the thing. It’s quick and doesn’t smudge …The great thing about these pencils … is the lack of fuss of them. … they don’t ask for much. The odd twist of the sharpener, yes. But not much more.

“Using a pencil I find myself following my best teaching advice: ‘Don’t rub out, just put a line through it’. It is as though the lack of physical pressure required to move my hand across the page somehow removes the psychological pressure to get it absolutely perfect first time. While I know it never will be, it’s a lesson I can never learn too often.”

Poet Anthony Wilson, “Pencil“, 11 May 2016

Monday Motivator: Whatever the Reason

Monday motivator art quotes
Monday motivator art quotes

“Whatever crazy, impractical, nonsensical reason there is for you to be an artist, consider the alternative. To paraphrase Robert Henri*–you can’t get rid of the part of you that yearns to be an artist, any more than you can get rid of your shadow. Embrace it.”

Robert Hunt, “Big questions. No Answers“, on Muddy Colors 8 April 2020

[*Robert Henri, 1865–1929, was an American artist and art tutor, whose teachings were collated in “The Art Spirit” first published in 1923 and still in print. And, yes, I have a copy.]


Some days our shadows are strong, other days we don’t have one. Sometimes it’s short, other times it stretches out far taller than we are.

Coral Beach sketching Isle of Skye

My Watercolour Recipe for Bluebell Blue

Yesterday I sat on a tree stump in the Uig woodland amongst the bluebells, with my watercolours. My aim was to try the various blues I have and see if I could crack “bluebell blue”. Looking at the options I had for shifting blues towards purple, I decided to try Imperial Purple (a Daniel Smith mixture of PV19 quinacridone rose and PB29 ultramarine blue) and mixed it with my favourite blue, Prussian (PB27). And just like that I had my recipe, andnow I can tick “paint bluebells in the woodland” off my to-do list.

This is the tree stump I sat on whilst painting bluebells. It was one of the trees cut down by the woodland trust last year because they were damaged or rotten.

A Dozen Daisies

A new grid template with two windows and slightly smaller than my one for this month’s project, led me to drawing a grid of 12 which I filled whilst looking through the studio window at the little dawn daisies.

After the pencil came watercolour, varying the greens I was using as I moved down.

Next some white acrylic, using a flat brush and a rigger.

Then yellow for the centres, first lemon but that felt too insipid so and had another round with cadium yellow medium.

I mixed blue in with the yellow for green, then a touch of orange into this for a second round with a more muted/muddy green.

Three photos of my palette, showing the small quantity of paint I had out.

This photo shows you the progess from drawing to finished:

I’ve added this painting to my webshop here, as one of my #ArtistSupoortPledge paintings.

My #ArtistSupportPledge Paintings

I’ve created a section on my webshop for my paintings for my #ArtistSupportPledge here. They’re priced to be affordable and small enough that I can pop them into my local postbox (free worldwide shipping, untracked).

The idea of the #ArtistSupportPledge is to help the creative community in these challenging times. Artists offer work for sale for no more than £200. Anyone can buy. When an artist reaches £1,000 of sales, they pledge to spend £200 on another artist’s work. The pledge was initially set up by Matthew Burrows (link).

If you’ve any requests, or would like to have first option on my next [whatever it may be], let me know as I hope to be painting and adding more each week. Take a look…